Glyn Hughes

26 March 2009
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23 March 2006

Nothing but the best in abstraction and figuration

Gaye Paterson is presenting the Amphora Series at Gallery k.

Gaye was born in Australia and graduated in Graphic Design from East Sydney National Art School in 1971.

Later, she studied printmaking at the Australian National University and then went to Bangkok where she established her etching studio, Inky Fingers Inc. The group met regularly and exhibited annually. In the late 1980s Paterson moved to the United States where she continued to study printmaking at the Circoran Art School, and at the Washington Studio School, Washington, DC.

Dedicated to printmaking, she is an active member of Atelier GE Grave, in Geneva, and continues making portfolios of prints during annual visits to Australia and the France Masereel Centrum, in Belgium.

The Amphora Series at Gallery k started on the Greek island of Skopelos in 2002, at the Skopart Foundation, an enormous purpose-built studio with excellent printmaking facilities, built high on a cliff top with a spectacular view of the sea.

Influence came from the bright colours of the island: blue shutters, green windows and doors, yellow chairs and the changing mood of the sea from pale misty mornings to deep midnight blue. The images drift and float reminiscent of a lazy summer afternoon on the Aegean island.

A truly, totally abstract exhibition full of energy and life.

Dialogue with the surface

Costas Joachim’s exhibition at Opus 39 has been covered well in the Arts pages the last few weeks but there is still chance to see his most recent paintings.

However, the exhibition closes this weekend, so do hurry. Opus 39 is at 21 Kimonos Street, Strovolos, Nicosia.

Here are some wonderful crits from well known art critics.

Tony Spiteris, General Secretary AICA writes:

“His style is personal and without references to other painting. The world of Costas Joachim is particular and unique; it captures with its lyrical character and pushes the imagination of into unknown virgin paths. Joachim echoes the inner beat of his heart and his sensations.

Joachim’s sensuous temperament is expressed by the enhancing of colour and shape inspired directly from nature. This is a type of work which demands an intimate participation by the viewer, through the abandoning of oneself to the pleasure of vision”.

Chrysanthos Christou, art historian and lecturer at the University of Bonn and the University of Salonica says:

“The basic characteristic of the painting of Costas Joachim is the emphasis on the flowing, kinetic, freely drawn shapes, the limited colour, the combination of the calligraphic line and strong composition. In several examples of his work, the fine graphic quality and the emphasis on free-moving forms, give a wonderful poetic and dreamlike content to his paintings. Vibrating surfaces, dialogues between colour and space, forms which develop with unlimited expansion over a white depth, give a rich expressive voice to his works and, moreover, a secret charm.”

And Richard Le Fanu, director, British Council:

“Costas Joachim’s swirling fluid paintings, based on mythological themes, blend the abstract and figurative in a highly individual manner, with their references to the landscape of Greece and the rocks and coastline of Cyprus.”

Surprise, surprise

Loukia Soteriou’s exhibition at Gloria Gallery is the biggest surprise of all this season.

Loukia recently walked into Gloria’s and asked if she could have a show.

A Cypriot in her twenties, she studied in Salonica.

As soon as I saw the works, I rushed home for my camera.

From a country of great icons and Diamantis (and others of that period) we now have brilliant figuration again. Not stuck in concepts and installations at all.

These portraits are not of young, beautiful people but studies of character in old age.

Men and women in the twilight of their years whose faces record the experience and the happiness and sadness they have experienced over the decades.

Look at one of these works for a while and you feel you have got to know the person in the painting, even though you have never met them.

For such a young artist, the works show an amazing depth of understanding and maturity.

It looks like a move forward.

Pantanassa

And now, another surprise.

This exhibition of paintings by Mary Plant and Evanthia Kouma will take place at the Head office of the Hellenic Bank, Paschalis L. Paschalides hall, corner Limassol and Athalassa Ave, Nicosia from 2nd to 12th April 2009

“The series of paintings and icons under the title ‘Pantanassa’ came about as a result of Mary Plant’s interest in Aphrodite and Evanthia Kouma’s interest in Byzantine icons and in particular the Panayia (Virgin Mary).Through the artist’s discussions concerning the two primary female figures of Cyprus, came the inspiration for a collaboration, highlighting the various epithets and attributes of Aphrodite and the Panayia and establishing any links that there might be between them.”

 
 
 27April2006   Art by Glyn Hughes - Cyprus weekly news paper           web creator  and updater V.P.Vasuhan -    http://vpvasuhan.tripod.com     @  redindian001   - Art work shop paris